Writing as Suzanne Phillips

Chloe Doe

Chloe Doe chronicles a 17-year-old girl’s tumultuous path to becoming a prostitute and her ultimate transformation back into mainstream society. During her therapy at Madeline Parker Institute for Girls, Chloe slowly reveals aspects of her painful past–the stepfather who abused her sister, the mother who let it all happen, the need to love and be loved–and faces the future she finally decides to build for herself. Told in heart-wrenching language that’s sometimes caustic, often ironic, and always authentic, Chloe Doe is certain to find a place among classics about teens that triumph over their loneliness and desperation to find hope.

Lindsey Lost

The Bourne Identity meets I Am the Cheese in this taut thriller

Even though Micah’s a star pitcher, his older sister Lindsey is the real deal–a runner so good, she has a shot at the Olympics. The two of them urge each other on, and are each other’s best support. Then the unthinkable happens: Lindsey is murdered, and Micah may have been the last person to see her. But he can’t remember what happened, no matter what their parents tell him, no matter what the police say. Did he witness his sister’s murder–or commit it? Can he recall the truth before his life is sentenced to end, too?

Burn

“Are our schools safe?” It’s hard to turn on the news without hearing this question, and the answer is typically “no.” This novel explores what happens when bullying escalates to violence, and it challenges our definition of victimization.

With thought-provoking prose, Suzanne Phillips explores the psyche of Cameron, a bullied freshman who ultimately does the unthinkable: he kills another student. As she did with Chloe Doe, Suzanne has found a way to make this seemingly dark story ultimately redemptive. But she also dares readers to look at the behavior that provokes violence as having the potential to be as dangerous as the violence itself.

It’s Suzanne’s hope that Burn will inspire readers to take a precautionary stance against bullying rather than waiting to react to it.

Suzanne Phillips

The winner of numerous awards and distinctions including her favorites: an ALA Popular Paperback and a panelist at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, “Problem Child” with Jacqueline Woodson, Laurie Halse Anderson and Nathan Powell.